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asks:
I'm either evil or a good friend...writer's ask meme numbers 1-50 please :D
Yeah, not gonna lie. You’re kinda evil. It’s cool though; I’ll answer all of these!!!! xD
  • 01:When did you first start writing? I first started writing in elementary school. Fourth grade is when I really remember writing things and just loving what I wrote. And the school I went to would put out a book every year that had all the grades work in it; everyone wrote something and it was published in that book. I still have at least one of those; it was so cool. 
  • 02:What was your favorite book growing up? I didn’t really have a favorite book per say. My favorite series was the Narnia series and The Babysitters Club series. One of my favorite authors was Eva Ibbotson; I loved her writing and stories! 
  • 03:Are you an avid reader? Yes. It’s an addiction that I am not willing to quit. Even if I am running out of room for my books…
  • 04:Have you ever thrown a book across the room? No. I’ve thrown a few down onto my bed though. 
  • 05:Did you take writing courses in school/college? I did. They helped me work out my writing style (which is still changing) and kind of pin down who I want to be as an author.
  • 06:Have you read any writing-advice books? Yep. I have Now Write! Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror edited by Luarie Lamson. I found that, even though I like writing/read those genres, I’m not able to write them as well as I feel like I can. And so I got the book. It’s pretty good too.
  • 07:Have you ever been part of a critique group? I haven’t. I wouldn’t even really know what do in one.
  • 08:What’s the best piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten? On one of my fanfics, I got a review that was really nice about pointing out things that I was having a hard time keeping historically accurate. The reviewer gave me facts and references and really helped me up my history game within the story. And they were so nice about it. It really made me smile. 
  • 09:What’s the worst piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten? A character was called a Mary Sue and when I asked for advice from the person on how they believe I could make her more realistic and believable, they never answered me back.  
  • 10:What’s your biggest writer pet-peeve? Writing an idea out and then everything petering out and just losing an entire moment because the idea decided that it just didn’t want to exist any more. 
  • 11:What’s your favorite book cover? The Burton & Swineburne series by Mark Hodder. I know that’s more than one cover, but they’re so pretty and action filled. Plus they have that feeling of whoa, you know?
  • 12:Who is your favorite author? At the moment it’s the writing duo of Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan. They are creeping me out wonderfully with The Strain.
  • 13:What’s your favorite writing quote? Ummmm….”Write everyday. Even if it’s just a few words. Write.” or something to that effect. I’m not sure who said it (or even where I heard it from) but I think of that when I don’t feel like writing. 
  • 14:What’s your favorite writing blog? c; terribleminds and fictionwritingtips
  • 15:What would you say has inspired you the most? That’s a really hard question. I get inspiration from a lot of things; a person I see on the street, dress I see in a store, a conversation that I over hear. Working. Playing with my dog. I can literally be inspired by anything. 
  • 16:How do you feel about movies based on books? It depends. As long as they’re well done, I’m all for them. There are some though that the book fandom ( and even the author) don’t like at all. I feel just a tiny bit sad (not really) that I can enjoy those. And then there are others where they just need to never have been made in the first place. I think it all depends on the movie crew thing though; the writers, directors, actors everything. If they can come together and make something the reflects the book in a positive manner and holds as true as it can to the original work that’s awesome. 
  • 17:Would you like your books to be turned into TV shows, movies, video games, or none? If I had to choose (and I’m under the assumption that it’s my books, as in original works by me), I’d say all three would work out fine. My stuff feels episodic and could easily be converted into any of those. 
  • 18:How do you feel about love triangles? I’m not against them. But if they’re unnecessary or poorly written then I don’t like them. 
  • 19:Do you prefer writing on a computer or longhand? I like both. I can plan things out better longhand and typing makes me feel as though I can actually get some where when I’m writing. 
  • 20:What’s your favorite writing program? Word. But I will use Notepad from time to time because it doesn’t have pages. I can just write forever and it feels as though I have written a lot. 
  • 21:Do you outline? Not really. I may write down what needs to happen in a scene or the story in general bullet-point style though.
  • 22:Do you start with characters or plot? Plot. Once I have the basics dealing with the plot, I’m able to character create. 
  • 23:What’s your favorite & least favorite part of making characters? Favorite part: giving them their personalities. Least favorite: giving them their names. 
  • 24:What’s your favorite & least favorite part of plotting? Favorite part: Big Picture. Least favorite: little picture. I tend to overlook what the correct amount of time is within my plots….
  • 25:What advice would you give to young writers? Don’t let anyone discourage you from writing what you want to write about. Write about everything and anything. Challenge yourself and write outside of your comfort zone.  
  • 26:Which do you enjoy reading the most: physical, ebook, or both? I enjoy physical books the best. I like holding them, feeling the pages, the smell of them. They’re the best. :D
  • 27:Which is your favorite genre to write? I like writing mystery/detective and supernatural genres. I do need to get better at them though. 
  • 28:Which do you find hardest: the beginning, the middle, or the end? The beginning and the end. I can write the middle stuff no problem; but trying to get the events rolling, or even stopping at a good point, is tough. 
  • 29:Which do you find easiest: writing or editing? Editing. My work or anyone elses, it’s just easier for me to see mistakes and figure out how to fix them. It’s also why I end up taking so much time when writing; I edit as I go. 
  • 30:Have you ever written fan-fiction? I have. I like writing fanfiction because it helps me polish my writing skills. 
  • 31:Have you ever been published? Once. I wrote a poem for my uncle after I found out he had passed away. It was included on the papers that were given to those that went to his funeral.  
  • 32:How do you feel about friends and close relatives reading your work? I’m scared. I really don’t like people I know reading my writing because then they’ll 1) know what’s going on inside my head and 2) I have this feeling that they’ll laugh at me. Even though I know that’s not true.
  • 33:Are you interested in having your work published? That’s the dream. I’d love my work to be published; but for that to happen I have to actually finish something.
  • 34:Describe your writing space. Cluttered. Just really really cluttered. 
  • 35:What’s your favorite time of day for writing? Night time. I can get some much written when I sit down and write at night.
  • 36:Do you listen to music when you write? Yes. Mostly to get into the Zone. But sometimes I find a mix or a song that fits what I’m writing and listen to that as inspiration for the scene. 
  • 37:What’s your oldest WIP? Probably the one about the computer cafe employee who can see things others can’t. 
  • 38:What’s your current WIP? Fairy tale detective story. 
  • 39:What’s the weirdest story idea you’ve ever had? I’m actually not sure. But it probably dealt with a fanfiction.
  • 40:Which is your favorite original character, and why? My favorite….Andersen. He’s an old school P.I. and totally hard boiled. 
  • 41:What do you do when characters don’t follow the outline? I try to bring it back to what was originally planned. If that doesn’t work then I make some changes and work with where it went.
  • 42:Do you enjoy making your characters suffer? Only a little. I mean yeah, I’m gonna make them suffer but it’s for their betterment and to progress the story. 
  • 43:Have you ever killed a main character? Not yet.
  • 44:What’s the weirdest character concept you’ve ever come up with? I’m…I’m actually not sure. 
  • 45:What’s your favorite character name? I really don’t have one. I try to choose names that will fit my characters’ personalities. And so it’s hard to choose one. 
  • 46:Describe your perfect writing space. An L-shaped desk with enough room for writing utensils, dictionaries, a few thesauruses, my computer and notebook. Maybe a nice lamp too. 
  • 47:If you could steal one character from another author and make then yours, who would it be and why? I really wouldn’t steal anyone away. I like how they’re written and I don’t feel like I would be able to do justice to any character as a writer. 
  • 48:If you could write the next book of any series, which one would it be, and what would you make the book about? Maybe a Discworld novel. Probably about Lord Vetinari’s life before becoming the Patrician. 
  • 49:If you could write a collaboration with another author, who would it be and what would you write about? I wouldn’t mind doing a collab with Mira Grant or Gail Carriger. Both would have something to do with octopuses. 
  • 50:If you could live in any fictional world, which would it be? At the moment, I wanna live in Gail Carriger’s London. 

Annnnnnd DONE!!!! Geez that took a while to do. But they are all answered and I’m happy with the answers. Kudos to me for getting them done! And now I’m going to let my fingers relax for a while….

bittergrapes:

lovelyandbrown:

daydreamsofarasta:

yungmethuselah:

ikazed:

youngblackandvegan:

black excellence

No, human excellence.

Let’s talk about set theory! In mathematical logic, we have a subfield called “set theory” where we study how items are collected into groups.
Providing a sort of logical bedrock, set theory informs foundational mathematics and computer science, among other fields, and continues to be a topic of mathematical research.
Sound too esoteric? Okay, you’re familiar with Venn diagrams, right? Venn diagrams are an example of basic set theory.

And you know how all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares? There we go, more set theory.
So, Black people are group within the larger group humans, i.e. all Black people are humans, BUT not all humans are Black people.
As you can see in the photograph above, Keven Stonewall, the Chicago teen who may cure colon cancer, is Black. Keven Stonewall’s membership in other groups such as humans, Chicagoans and teenagers occurs simultaneously; consider “Chicago teen.”
Why do we say “square” when we could say “rectangle”? Because “square” conveys useful information, including “rectangle”—as well as a refinement.
When we say Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence, we mean Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence.

👊👊👊

read DOWNNNNNE

Black excellence! And … Black Chicago excellence! Repping the South side, I’m so proud of him! Rush University is great!

bittergrapes:

lovelyandbrown:

daydreamsofarasta:

yungmethuselah:

ikazed:

youngblackandvegan:

black excellence

No, human excellence.

Let’s talk about set theory! In mathematical logic, we have a subfield called “set theory” where we study how items are collected into groups.

Providing a sort of logical bedrock, set theory informs foundational mathematics and computer science, among other fields, and continues to be a topic of mathematical research.

Sound too esoteric? Okay, you’re familiar with Venn diagrams, right? Venn diagrams are an example of basic set theory.

image

And you know how all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares? There we go, more set theory.

So, Black people are group within the larger group humans, i.e. all Black people are humans, BUT not all humans are Black people.

As you can see in the photograph above, Keven Stonewall, the Chicago teen who may cure colon cancer, is Black. Keven Stonewall’s membership in other groups such as humans, Chicagoans and teenagers occurs simultaneously; consider “Chicago teen.”

Why do we say “square” when we could say “rectangle”? Because “square” conveys useful information, including “rectangle”—as well as a refinement.

When we say Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence, we mean Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence.

👊👊👊

read DOWNNNNNE

Black excellence! And … Black Chicago excellence! Repping the South side, I’m so proud of him! Rush University is great!

mizgnomer:

Please choose your own favorite way to describe these gifs:

  • The Tenth Doctor putting on the Fifth Doctor’s coat
  • David Tennant putting on Peter Davison’s Doctor’s coat
  • David Tennant putting on his father-in-law’s coat
  • A Doctor Who fan putting on the coat belonging to one of his favorite Doctors
  • Father of The Doctor’s Daughter putting on the coat belonging to the father of The Doctor’s Daughter
  • Complete Doctor Who coat awesomeness

tardis-devilstrap-deathlyhollows:

yellow-turtle:

obsessionisaperfume:

ssjdebusk:

oh look # he loves humanity # but isnt IN love # theres a difference (via zerostumbleine33)

OH MY CHUCK. *collapses laughing*

Gadreel only loves humanity platonically.  They’re just friends.

No homo- sapien

draikinator:

essayofthoughts:

indigoumbrella:

essayofthoughts:

indigoumbrella:

huffpostarts:

In The Not So Distant Future, Glow-In-The-Dark Trees Could Replace Street Lights

Is that… is that even healthy?

There are sea organisms and fungi which glow in the dark and there’s fireflies and jellyfish which glow in the dark. It doesn’t do them any harm nor does it do the people around them any harm. I would say its pretty healthy, as well as it would mean more photosynthesis happening in cities which mean cleaner air.

I was just curious about how they were doing it and for some reason I didn’t think to click the link. But thanks! It makes more sense now. I was afraid it was some kind of chemical thing.

nah just genetic modification using existing bioluminescent genes. Genetics is really cool, and so is bioluminescence. I mean they’ve already made pigs glow using jellyfish genes and pigs are waaay more complicated than trees iirc. So they’re actually (i think) less likely to muck it up with trees.

In which case

GLOWY

FORESTS

GLOWY

TREES

GLOWY

EVERYTHING

(I like glowy things)

means more trees which is good

uses less electricity which is good (for both tax reasons and also just because  reasons)

pretties everything up

just generally all good stuff

glowy trees 2k15 plz

minutes-to-hours:

WHY ISN’T THIS EVERYWHERE ALREADY

the-fangirls-have-the-phonebox:

amelia-e-grey:

senecasbearddontgiveafuck:

13pianos:

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and she can’t remember who i am

exCUSE ME